Illustrating American Power and Privilege: Images of Mexico as the Other in Albert S. Evans’s Our Sister Republic: A Gala Trip Through Tropical Mexico in 1869-70

Abstract: 

After the U.S.-Mexican War, internal power struggles weakened the Mexico, and France forcefully established a government in 1862. In 1867, the United States (U.S.) invoked the Monroe Doctrine and placed military and political support behind exiled Mexican president Benito Ju´arez. This political action pressured France to withdraw from Mexico and demonstrated how the U.S. exercised on-going hegemony over Mexico. This paper argues the images and text in Albert S. Evans’s Our Sister Republic: A Gala Trip Through Tropical Mexico in 1869-70 misrepresented Mexico to justify American imperialism. Through the lens of postcolonial theory, the images are closely examined and analyzed for what they reveal about U.S. relations with Mexico.

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